Posted 1 day ago with 13,108 notes
© praydeath



punkhie:



Posted 1 day ago with 392 notes
© theleoisallinthemind



i-like-to-obsess:

petition to ban “i kissed a girl” from all queer girl fanmixes 2k14


Posted 2 days ago with 12,599 notes
© i-like-to-obsess



You used to be much more… “muchier.” You’ve lost your muchness.

Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland 

Everything you love is here

(via lovequotesrus)

Posted 2 days ago with 5,037 notes
© kitty-en-classe

#quote  


iwriteaboutfeminism:

Saturday morning, over 1,000 people march for justice for Michael Brown. 

August 30th.



Posted 2 days ago with 44,301 notes
© iwriteaboutfeminism

#ferguson  


foto-jennic:

A woman is like a tea bag - you can’t tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water.” - Eleanor Roosevelt


Welcome to Women’s History Month



Posted 2 days ago with 80,614 notes
© pinterest.com



alittlehartosexual:

This, ladies and gentlemen, is pure sexism in everyday society.



Posted 2 days ago with 144,424 notes
© harmaleizer



Happening Now: Pakistan

fattysaid:

Sources to keep you informed and updated about the latest developments in Pakistan. I have tried to include a wide variety of viewpoints. I am not condoning/promoting any side, it’s up to you to inform yourself. This is by no means a comprehensive list and to take this list out of context i.e. to just make up your mind about the situation without first understanding the complex nature and origins of this ongoing crisis is to commit a really grave mistake. Stay informed, yes, but this crisis didn’t begin a few hours, days or even a few weeks ago. This crisis has been ongoing for decades. Don’t rush to make conclusions or to hype something up, especially when it involves something as serious as the prospect of military intervention. Tread with caution.

This list will be continuously updated so keep checking back for the latest updates. Please drop me a message or leave a comment on this post regarding any source which you think should be included on the list below:

Live Streams from the Protests in Islamabad (Urdu):

News Outlets:

On tumblr:

On Twitter:


Posted 2 days ago with 6,556 notes

#pakistan  


camkoa:

Love my school



Posted 2 days ago with 34,525 notes

#ferguson  



Posted 2 days ago with 1,259 notes
© tomorrowandbeyond

#cm  



Posted 2 days ago with 10,038 notes
© nickimlnaj

#nicki minaj  


generalsecretaryofthecpp:

Women, men, children, the elderly, no one is safe under Nawaz Sharif’s government.

The Pakistani police are using rubber bullets and tear gas shells against peaceful protesters in Islamabad

Police brutality will not stop peaceful change. The joint PTI and PAT revolutionaries will continue to march towards the PM’s house to demand his resignation.

Join the revolution. Support change



Posted 2 days ago with 3,942 notes

#pakistan  


DIANA REASSEMBLED - Wonder Woman #37 (2009)



Posted 2 days ago with 257 notes
© novaeater

#cm  


5 Things You Need To Know About The Anti-Government Protests In Pakistan

johnmarson:

Source: Carbonated.TV

August 20, 2014: Here’s why tens of thousands of people have taken to the streets in Pakistan.

image

Image: B.K. Bangash/Associated Press

The streets of Islamabad – the capital city of Pakistan – remains flooded with tens of thousands of people on Wednesday who want the ruling government to step down and resign.

The protests – which remained peaceful over the course of one week –raised questions over the stability of the South Asian nation that has a population of about 180 million people.

What’s happening in Pakistan right now is really important, but the situation is presently unfolding and it can be tough to keep track.

Here are answers to some of the most basic questions you might have on the issue. Below is a simplification of all the complex information available on the anti-government movement which has underscored the fragility of democracy in Pakistan.

The leaders:

There are two separate protests, under two different leaders, with the same purpose – to overthrow the ruling government under Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif.

Imran Khan:

image

Image: Twitter

Cricket-star-turned-politician Imran Khan is one of the most popular as well as controversial figures in Pakistan.

Khan’s political party, the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (“Movement for Justice”) has morphed into a dominant political force over the past decade.

It’s widely believed that the former sportsman was responsible for getting many Pakistanis to come out and vote for the first time in the general election held last year.

However, he is also known as “Taliban Khan” because of his soft stance on terrorist organizations. Khan believes in negotiations with the Taliban based in Pakistan instead of using military force against them.

image

Image: Twitter

READ MORE: The First Democratic Transition In Pakistan Might Not Be All Smooth Sailing

Tahir ul-Qadri:

image

Image: B.K. Bangash/Associated Press

Tahir ul-Qadri is a Pakistani-Canadian Sufi cleric who remains one of the most unlikely leaders of the country.

His political party,the Pakistan People’s Movement– though founded in 1990 – rose to prominence in 2013 when Qadri led a massive assembly of charged protestors to Islamabad for “bringing about a change” in the country.

RELATED: Pakistan’s March To A Change; Or Is This Another Ploy By The Armed Forces? Conspiracies Thrive

image

Image: B.K. Bangash/Associated Press

The Problem:

Although there are two different political groups involved in the protests, both of them are anti-government.

Khan called for a “Freedom March” (aka Tsunami March) against the incumbentadministration’s inadequacy in addressing and resolving allegations of rigging in the 2013 general election.

He also called for a widespread civil disobedience in the country, urging his supporters to stop paying taxes and utility bills in a bid to oust the government.

Tahir ul Qadri, a self-proclaimed Stalinist revolutionary, on the other hand demands that Pakistan’s democratic system be reformed.

On June 17, 2014,activists from Qadri’s political party clashed with law enforcement officers – an incident which resulted in the death of 14 members,including over 90 injuries due to bullets fired by police.

Subsequently in August, he called for public protests to avenge the fallen activists and to throw the “criminals” out of the government.

The army’s response:

Since Pakistan has remained a rather “coup-prone” country over the past six decades, there are speculations whether it’sarmy is engineering the twin protest movements behind the scenes.

Although there was no response initially, an anonymous government source told Reuters that the military has said there will be no coup. But if Prime Minister Sharif wants his government to survive, he will have to share space with the army.

Publicly, however, the military urged both the government and the protesting political parties to find a diplomatic solution.

The government’s response:

So far, at the time of writing this post, the government has shown neither any flexibility nor hostility towards the protesters.

A senior government representative, though,has said that the ruling political party – Pakistan Muslim League (N) – is ready to talk with the opposition “but not under duress.”

“We are ready to talk with both the PTI and PAT but their unconstitutional demands cannot be accepted,” Federal Minister Saad Rafique told press reporters on Wednesday.

Criticism:

A military operation was launched by Pakistan’s armed forces against insurgent groups in the northern part of the country which borders Afghanistan.

As a result of the offensive, 929,859 displaced civilians (from 80,302 families) were registered by Pakistani authorities as of 14 July.

While the leaders of the twin protests, Khan and Qadri, have thousands of supporters, not everyone in Pakistan thinks the protests make sense – especially when there is a war going on in one part of the country.

image

There is also a lot of criticism surrounding the government’s indifference towards the chaos in Islamabad.

image

Will these protests be the tipping point for Pakistan’s fragile democracy- only time will tell.

Source: Carbonated.Tv


Posted 2 days ago with 1,011 notes
© johnmarson

#pakistan  


masturbraiding:

Do you ever catch yourself thinking rude things about someone or judging them and you’re like “hey stop that, that’s not nice don’t u do that”


Posted 2 days ago with 66,125 notes
© masturbraiding





« Newer | Older »

THIS SITE IS BEST VIEWED ON MOZILLA FIREFOX WITH A SCREEN RESOLUTION OF 1280 X 800.